6 Things You Didn’t Know About THC

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6 Things You Didn’t Know About THC

Monday, July 10th, 2017

all about thc

The primary ingredient in marijuana is THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol. It’s the compound responsible for making you feel high. It also offers a variety of medical benefits, and is commonly used by patients with depression, nausea, and more. In this post, we’re going to show you 6 things that you (most likely) didn’t know about THC.

  1. THC Has Been Used in Various Pharmaceuticals

There are a few FDA-approved pharmaceutical drugs that have THC in them. The first one created was called Marinol. In 1985, it was approved by the FDA to be used as a treatment for nausea and vomiting in patients undergoing chemotherapy. As you may know, a major side effect of chemotherapy is nausea. THC helps counteract this, which can increase morale in cancer patients. Others include Sativex and Cesamet, both of which contain THC.

  1. THC Was Discovered in 1964

While marijuana plants have been around for millions of years, it was only recently that humans discovered THC. THC was discovered in 1964 by a scientist named Dr. Raphael Mechoulam. Back in the 60s, he noticed that many scientists were isolating compounds in cocaine and morphine, yet, ignoring marijuana. He took it upon himself to isolate the compounds in marijuana, which led him to discover THC. Because of his discovery, Dr. Mechoulam was awarded the NIDA Discovery Award in 2011.

  1. THC Protects Brain Cells

Playing smoking games with friends is fun no doubt, but did you know that THC offers cognitive benefits as well? Specifically, the THC in marijuana is known to protect brain cells as well as stimulate their growth. The THC protects the brain cells from oxidative stress and inflammation. It was in 2005 that researchers at the University of Saskatchewan discovered that THC was able to stimulate the growth of new brain cells. Known as “Neurogenesis,” this process can help preserve brain function.

  1. THC is Only One of 50+ Compounds in Marijuana

Many people think that THC is the only compound in marijuana. However, this couldn’t be further from the truth. There are over 50 compounds in marijuana (that we know of), each of which affect the body in a slightly different way. It’s safe to say that, in the future, we may discover more compounds in marijuana that we didn’t know about before. We’ll also learn about how each one of these compounds affects the body. Marijuana research is still in its infancy, but we’re moving closer to the truth every day.

  1. THC-Like Molecules Exist Naturally in The Body

After the discovery of THC, researchers began searching for THC-like molecules that existed naturally in the body. And, after some searching, they discovered a few. One in particular was called “Anandamide.” Anandamide is a naturally-occurring cannabinoid that’s produced by certain parts of the body (including the brain). You might be surprised to hear that Anandamide and THC act on similar biochemical pathways. Specifically, they both act on cannabinoid receptors, which is quite cool!

  1. Inactivated” THC Won’t Make You High  

Many people associate THC with feeling high and euphoria. However, THC doesn’t always have to make you feel high. Why is this? It’s because the THC found in marijuana plants is THCA, which is a precursor to THC. THCA doesn’t cause any of the euphoric or feelings of high that you normally experience when smoking weed. This is why ingesting weed raw won’t cause you to feel anything (other than sick). It’s only when THCH is exposed to heat that it’s able to provide the psychoactive benefits normally associated with cannabis.

Conclusion

THC is an interesting molecule to say the least. Overtime, scientists will learn more about how this molecule acts on the body. As they learn more about it, they may be able to develop therapies around this drug designed to target various diseases and ailments.

(Why?)

Published at Mon, 10 Jul 2017 04:21:20 +0000

Solo 2 Vaporizer

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Solo 2 Vaporizer

Sunday, July 9th, 2017

The Canadian vaporizer company Arizer has been at the forefront of fun and functional vaporizers since they jumped into the market, with a variety of desktop and portable vaporizers they showed the world that they meant business. The Arizer Solo was an instant favorite, appealing to vapers from all walks of life; the minimal learning curve brought in new vapers while the high quality of the device appealed to more seasoned sessioners. The Solo 2 has been long awaited, and now it’s finally here people can’t wait to get their hands on it! The question is, if you own a Solo should you upgrade? What makes the Solo 2 the best vaporizer from Arizer? What’s new?

Heating up

The Solo 2 brings a brand new interior to the table, and it’s a good one at that! The oven chamber can heat up as high as 430 degrees Fahrenheit, starting at 120. This can be changed digitally with precision, meaning if you’re looking for a specific temperature for releasing various cannabinoids you’re in luck here. With only 30 seconds til full heat, this is one of the faster vaporizers on the market with some taking as long as 3 minutes. The last thing you want is to have to wait to start your session for your device to heat up!

Charge Ahead

One of the few complaints about the original Solo was the battery power, an issue immediately rectified by this newer release! The new vaporizer from Arizer brings a battery that lasts much longer, as far as 3 hours of continuous use which is massive. They have moved the charging portal from underneath the device to the back, meaning that as well as being able to be used while plugged in you can now charge your vape standing upright. Once the vaporizer has been plugged in for around 5 minutes it is ready to go again, charging cable and all!

Slim and Sleek

The Solo 2 comes with a refreshed and updated look, moving away from the clunkier design of its predecessor in favor of a slimmer, more travel-friendly shape. The new modern look is super attractive, fitting in easily alongside the big players like the Pax 3, DaVinci IQ, and the Firefly 2. Like with mobile phones, futuristic and sleek appearances are preferred to the bigger and bulkier pieces of tech in the past. A smaller design means it’s easy to pop into your pocket and carry around with you! Bring it to parties to show to friends, or to festivals where glass pieces would be dangerous. There is nothing like enjoying a quick hit while out adventuring in the outdoors!

Upgrade worthy?

Not only are there many benefits to the new device, there are also notable and visible improvements. The battery is long-lasting, to the extent where it is one of the longer lasting devices on the market, but it’s also 50% longer than the original. 30 seconds heat up is very impressive, and also happens to be x4 faster than the Solo. The Solo 2 took any and all complaints about the Solo and worked on them, and it’s very apparent. Any company putting that much effort to fix the issues raised by its consumers has definitely worked its hardest to make sure the entire vaporizer is the best it can possibly be! Putting the customer first is really great to see from such a big company, and Arizer has set an industry standard for listening to their fanbase now. Hopefully, this inspires other companies to listen as closely as they have, and we will see such great improvements as with the Solo 2 in other devices!

(Why?)

Published at Sun, 09 Jul 2017 05:29:51 +0000

Michigan Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Meets

Michigan Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Meets

Michigan Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Meets

On Monday, June 26, 2017, Dykema attorneys were present as Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board conducted its first public meeting in Lansing, Michigan. This meeting was the first time that members of the public had the opportunity to address the newly-appointed Board, and marijuana industry advocates and participants took full advantage, overflowing the G. Mennen Williams Building’s auditorium.

At the outset of the meeting, Board Chairman and former Michigan House Speaker Rick Johnson made clear that the inaugural meeting would not be a question and answer session, but that the Board would listen to public comment as its members continue to learn about the issues that lie ahead. Members of the public to address the Board included attorneys, dispensary owners, caregivers, patients, and township trustees, who collectively voiced varying concerns about the uncertainty in the medical marihuana field that will continue to exist until the rulemaking process concludes.

From the activist community, some speakers criticized the composition of the Board, questioning both the political make-up (appointees include only Republicans and Independents) and the fact that Board member Don Bailey is a retired Michigan State Police Trooper with a history of drug enforcement work. (Board member David LaMontaine is also a police officer, and a law enforcement background is hardly unheard of on a regulatory board—the Executive Director of Michigan’s Gaming Control Board was a longtime officer with the Macomb County Sheriff’s Office.)

Toward the end of the meeting, Mr. Bailey explained that marijuana obviously involves law enforcement issues, causing some consternation when he offered the observation that the Board may have trouble believing potential licensees who had failed to comply with the current Michigan Medical Marihuana Act would comply with the new law going forward. He also noted that going forward, the Board’s duty is to follow and apply the law, not personal views. Other members of the Board echoed comments demonstrating that they are eager to hear and learn from the public. Chairman Johnson encouraged members in the audience to continue to make their voices heard and to work together with the Board as the process unfolds.

Chairman Johnson concluded by indicating that there would be “at least” one public meeting between June and October of this year. As we have written previously, the timelines in Michigan’s rulemaking process will force the State to promulgate emergency rules to be able to comply with the law’s December 15, 2017 date for accepting licensure applications. Because emergency rules can only extend for one year, we expect the State to begin work on promulgating final rules nearly simultaneously.

Check back with Dykema’s Cannabis Law Blog for further updates regarding future Board meetings and other news relating to the rulemaking process.

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 27 Jun 2017 16:00:00 +0000

Fourth Corner Credit Union Obtains Pyrrhic Victory for Marijuana Banking

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Fourth Corner Credit Union Obtains Pyrrhic Victory for Marijuana Banking

Fourth Corner Credit Union Obtains Pyrrhic Victory for Marijuana Banking

The long-awaited  Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in the case of Fourth Corner Credit Union v. Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City was issued this week. In short: the would-be credit union, formed to serve participants in the state-legal marijuana sector, lives to fight another day—but minus its original purpose for existing.

Background

Fourth Corner Credit Union was originally formed to solve an acute problem for marijuana-related businesses (MRBs) and individuals associated with MRBs: the inability to obtain mainstream banking services. Without access to bank or credit union accounts, MRBs remain chiefly cash-based businesses, left to their own devices to figure out how to store money and move it around, including how to pay employees and vendors, and to keep cash safe from theft. 

Despite many state laws allowing marijuana activity, the possession, cultivation, and sale of marijuana all are patently illegal under the federal Controlled Substances Act (CSA). The U.S. Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) has issued guidance as to how financial institutions may meet their Bank Secrecy Act/anti-money-laundering (BSA/AML) compliance obligations while serving MRBs, incorporating guidance from the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) to U.S. Attorney’s Offices regarding situations in which federal law enforcement resources should or should not be focused on state-legal marijuana activity. But none of these issuances have the power to change the CSA or other laws, or to authorize financial institutions to serve MRBs in the first place (even if BSA/AML obligations are met to FinCEN’s satisfaction). And so, to date, the vast majority of financial institutions remain unwilling to deal with MRBs.

Fourth Corner’s organizers saw an opportunity to leverage state law to solve this problem. They could obtain a state credit union charter in Colorado, a state friendly to MRBs, rather than a federal charter. (While state-chartered entities are still subject to federal law, it could be possible that state regulators might be more open to allowing their state-chartered institutions to work with MRBs operating legally under their state laws.) Colorado offers the additional benefit of being among the few states to provide a mechanism for allowing state-chartered credit unions to obtain share insurance (comparable to FDIC deposit insurance for banks) from a private insurer rather than from the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). That would eliminate the involvement of one more federal regulator, and perhaps keep the credit union’s activity as much as possible within the friendlier confines of state regulation.

But at least one federal authority could not be circumvented. The Federal Reserve controls a major payment system that banks and credit unions use to move money around. Without a “master account” on that system, the Fourth Corner Credit Union would likely not be able to do business, as it would be limited in its ability to move funds.

The Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, the entity handling Fourth Corner’s application for a master account, denied the application, due in part to the fact that the credit union’s business model centered on serving members whose activity is illegal under federal law.

Fourth Corner sued in federal district court in Colorado, seeking injunctive relief forcing the Kansas City Fed to give the credit union a master account. In January 2016, the court declined to grant this relief and dismissed the case with prejudice, citing the illegality of marijuana activity under the federal CSA.

Fourth Corner appealed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, which heard oral argument in November 2016. 

The Tenth Circuit’s Opinion

On June 27, a divided three-judge panel of the Tenth Circuit issued three separate opinions in the case, overlapping in some issues and in direct conflict in others, inviting the need for a Venn diagram to sort out the interplay among the three. But in short, the court vacated the district court’s order and directed that court to dismiss the amended complaint without prejudice. This allows Fourth Corner to have the case heard again.  

While this seems like a victory for Fourth Corner, in practice the purpose of the credit union is  now watered down. This is because Fourth Corner had amended its complaint to provide that it would comply with any applicable law, and thus presumably not serve MRBs that violate federal law, only persons operating legally such as non-MRB supporters of legal marijuana. Since the district court did not directly rule on that amended complaint, the Tenth Circuit said, it can be reconsidered. Thus, Fourth Corner is now free to pursue its case, and/or its master account application, premised on serving only those who are not operating in violation of the CSA or other law. 

On those terms, is it worth pursuing?

To proceed, Fourth Corner must essentially abandon the business model that was its reason for existing—the ability to serve MRBs and persons affiliated with MRBs that operate in violation of the CSA, and who for that reason have been shut out of mainstream banking channels. Now, it appears that Fourth Corner is now free to pursue the ability to operate a credit union that can only serve persons that could already be served by existing banks and credit unions.

If the credit union were to open, given the credit union’s original stated purpose—to serve MRBs, which, by their nature, violate federal law—it is also reasonable to expect that it would be subject to some additional regulatory scrutiny. In particular, regulators would likely be focused on confirming that only legal transactions were flowing through the credit union, and that MRBs were not obtaining services from the credit union under false pretenses. For instance, regulators could require that the credit union establish account opening and monitoring policies and procedures that are more detailed and intensive than would ordinarily be required. This scrutiny could come from state regulators as well, since all bank and credit union regulators have an interest in having their supervised institutions maintain compliance with applicable laws and appropriately mitigate risks. That is not only the province of federal regulators.

In theory, the credit union might be able to open for business to serve a more general population of members operating legally, then later decide to also serve MRBs, as a small number of other financial institutions are doing. However, this would  carry a number of risks. It could be halted at any time by regulators or law enforcement, as, again, MRBs’ activity inherently violates federal law. And if the master account approval were premised on not serving such businesses, the Fed could withdraw account access, to name one possible consequence. And, through publicity from this legal action, the credit union could attract some heightened level of attention from federal authorities.

Takeaways for Marijuana Banking

Does this opinion advance the ball for marijuana banking?

In short, no. The judges, though divided on certain issues, did not give credence to any argument that state marijuana law somehow trumps or abridges the conflicting federal CSA.

Fourth Corner is now free to pursue the ability to open for business to serve persons and businesses that are already operating legally—not in violation of the CSA or other law. This is something it did not have to go to court in order to do.  

The experience of Fourth Corner so far is an important case study. It shows the power that federal law—particularly the CSA—continues to have to encumber the operations of businesses that operate in full compliance with state laws. It shows that there is no way to craft a magic solution to the marijuana banking problem by using only state chartering and licensing regimes. And it shows that the underlying federal statutory  law must change in order for the marijuana banking issue to truly become unstuck.

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 29 Jun 2017 16:00:00 +0000

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Announces First Meeting

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Announces First Meeting

Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Licensing Board Announces First Meeting

Some six months after Michigan’s new Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act took effect, the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board created by that Act today announced its first meeting.

On Monday, June 26, 2017, at 1:30 p.m., the Board will meet in the first floor auditorium in the State’s G. Mennen Williams Building, the building that houses the State’s Attorney General’s office. (The Williams Building is located at 525 West Ottawa in Lansing.)

The agenda released by the Board announces that this will be the Board’s organizational meeting. As required by the State’s Open Meetings Act, there will also be an opportunity for public comment.

The members of the Medical Marihuana Facilities Board were appointed by Gov. Snyder last month. Chaired by former Michigan House Speaker Rick Johnson, the Board also consists of Donald Bailey, Nichole Cover, David LaMontaine, and Vivian Pickard.

For more information on the activities of Michigan’s Medical Marihuana Facilities Board and the State’s creation of a new regulatory framework for medical marijuana, check back with the Cannabis Law Blog.

(Why?)

Published at Sun, 18 Jun 2017 16:00:00 +0000

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

CBD Oil: What is it and Does It Get You High?

Friday, June 2nd, 2017

cbd oil molecule

About CBD Oil

CBD oil  (cannabidiol oil) has been getting extremely popular these past few years after receiving attention from the media and the medical field. These oils generally contains less then 1% THC which is within the legal limit. You can consume this oil in a variety of different ways making it a great choice for people who are looking to receive the medical benefits of smoking without the traditional high. The other great think about CBD oil is that it’s completely legal to buy and have on you!

So Does It Get You High?

Many people have been asking us the question, can CBD oil get you high? The simple answer is no, although the oil can help reduce anxiety, help with pain, reducing inflammation and even fighting off cancer cells, it doesn’t give you the same high you would get from smoking weed. Many people report a slight “head high” when using CBD oil and a lot of people also have said that it helps them relax and unwind after a long stressful day.

How Do I Use It?

The majority of the people who use CBD oil do so through a vape. Your typical bottle of CBD vape oil comes in a few different strengths. For beginners 18mg is the recommended starting dose although bottles can go all the way up to 80mg. Just like traditional e-liquid you can choose from hundreds of great tasting flavors.

You can also use CBD oil through a bunch of different CBD infused lotions and creams. Just rub the cream on the area that’s sore or in pain for instant relief. This method of consumption is great for people who don’t want to smoke it or need relief in a specific area of there body. In addition to vapes and lotions you can also get CBD infused edibles and drinks!

Will I Fail A Drug Test?

Although a pure CBD oil does not contain any active THC, traces can occasionally be found and some oils contains up to 1% THC. Although this isn’t enough to tip off most drug tests, you could still possibly fail a drug test if you have used CBD vape oil due to the small traces of THC found in it.

Where Can I Get Some?

Luckily CBD oil is legal in all 50 states and 30 other countries worldwide! This means that you can order these oils from the comfort of your own home and have it shipped directly to your doorstep. Although the more expensive route, you can also find CBD vape oils at your local convenience store or gas station.

So should you start consuming CBD oil? That depends, if you could benefit from the relaxing and medical properties then you should definitely go snag some CBD oil now at Cannabidiol Life.

(Why?)

Published at Fri, 02 Jun 2017 04:25:06 +0000